Discuss differences between Civil Law and Criminal Law
You must submit a main post and a response post to one of you classmates TWO separate POST
Question: Discuss differences between Civil Law and Criminal Law

POST ONE (60 points): Respond to the discussion post question.
· Provide a 200 word discussion.
· Do not copy and paste from any source.
· Obtain the material from sources such as journal articles, books, internet, etc…
· Post must be original (i.e. created by you, your thoughts, your understanding of the concepts)
· If a source is used, it must be cited correctly to meet APA standards.
POST TWO (40 points): Each student will then have to make a follow up post. Reply to a fellow student’s post or reply to one of the instructor’s questions.
· Add something substantive to his/her post. Keep the discussion going!
· Provide a 100 word discussion.
· Do not copy and paste from any source.
· Post must be original (i.e. created by you, your thoughts, your understanding of the concepts)
· If a source is used, it must be cited correctly to meet APA standards.
FELLOW STUDENTS POST
Madelca Martinez
Discuss differences between Civil Law and Criminal Law

Within the United States, there are two bodies of law whose primary purpose is to deter or punish serious crimes or to compensate victims of such crimes. Criminal law and civil law differ in many respects, for example with respect to how cases are initiated, who may file charges or bring a lawsuit, how cases are decided by a judge or jury, what type of punishment or penalty may be imposed, what standards of proof must be met, and what legal protections may be available to the defendant. In criminal cases, for example, only the federal or state government can initiate a case; cases are almost always decided by a jury; punishment for serious charges often consists of imprisonment, but may also include a fine paid to the government; to secure conviction, the prosecution must establish the defendant’s guilt “beyond a reasonable doubt.” and defendants are protected against police or prosecutorial conduct that violates their constitutional rights, including the right against unreasonable searches and seizures Fourth Amendment and the right against compelled self-incrimination Fifth Amendment. In civil cases, by contrast, cases are initiated, by a private party known as the plaintiff; cases are generally decided by a judge, although important cases may involve juries; punishment almost always consists of a monetary reward and never consists of imprisonment; to prevail, the plaintiff must establish the defendant’s liability only according to the “preponderance of the evidence”; and defendants are not entitled to the same legal protections as criminal defendants. Importantly, because a single wrongful act can constitute both a public offense and a private wrong, it can give rise to both criminal and civil charges. A widely cited example is that of former soccer player O.J. Simpson: in 1995 he was acquitted of murdering his wife and her friend, but two years later he was found liable for their murders in a civil wrongful death lawsuit.
References:
Kenneth (1993) The Prince and the Law, 1200–1600: Sovereignty and Rights in the Western Legal Tradition, University of California Press