The following works depict the effects of war: “Cranes,” by Hwang Sun-won; “Thoughts of Hanoi,” by Nguyen Thi Vinh; and “Tokyo, ” by Fumiko Hayashi.
1:
The following works depict the effects of war: “Cranes,” by Hwang Sun-won; “Thoughts of Hanoi,” by Nguyen Thi Vinh; and “Tokyo, ” by Fumiko Hayashi. Please use your textbook as reference.

Choose one of those works and contrast (only discuss the differences) it to another work of your choosing that depicts the effects of war. That work can be one of the stories in the unit, or another poem, short story, song (e.g. “One” by Metallica), or a movie.

Write a fully developed paragraph that contrasts (remember, only differences) the effects of war in one of the works above, to the other work that you have chosen.

2:
At the end of the story, the main character in “The Saboteur,” does something rather unspeakable and ends up killing six people due to his actions. Do you think the mistreatment of Mr. Chiu justifies his action at the end? Why or why not?

3:
The BIG question:
Can humanity overlook cultural and personal differences or are we doomed to conflict?

This whole crazy curriculum is built on the theme statement that “by learning and examining the stories of other cultures, we will learn commonality: we all share in the human experience and that, despite our differences, we can all get along…if we can learn about others.” But…can we? Are some cultures too different, some ideas too strange? Is humanity destined to fight itself?
Choose a position (yes, we can get along by learning the stories of others, or no, we can’t) and argue why we can all get along by learning the stories of other cultures or why we, as people will never completely get along.

Make sure to use TWO examples from any of the texts that we have read this year (Including “The Monsters are Due on Maple Street,” which will be performed in class). Be sure to include the title of each selection you cite as evidence.